Tales from the road

The road from Podgorica to Pristina 

 

The road from Podgorica to Pristina

On the bus from Pristina to Skopje.

I just watched the video from the Chilean news report.  Wow.  They used a ton of my video footage and a helluva lot of the stuff they shot of me in interviews.  I totally didn’t expect to see all of that.  It was also amusing to see shots of some of my friends that I met in Chile, like Susan and Marius.

I wonder if anything will happen to those guys, considering their faces are all over the Chilean national news.
It’s amazing that that was pretty much the fantasy I had of what could happen in the situation, with the key caveat that I didn’t expect that I would be the one front and center of the situation.
But hey, if being the star of an investigative journalism special doesn’t change anything, I don’t know what will.  And it’s been pretty cool getting messages from random people about how they feel bad for me and how they think I’m cool (despite not knowing me).
Twice in a row, I’ve gotten political opinions from people in one place about the country that I am going to next.  The first was a Montenegrin girl saying that she didn’t think Kosovo should be a country, as it should be part of Serbia, since it was her opinion that the Albanians just showed up, then wanted their own country.
The second case was a Kosovan guy saying (with chagrin) that he took Greece’s side on the Macedonian naming dispute.On the bus from Pristina to Skopje.
I just watched the video from the Chilean news report.  Wow.  They used a ton of my video footage and a helluva lot of the stuff they shot of me in interviews.  I totally didn’t expect to see all of that.  It was also amusing to see shots of some of my friends that I met in Chile, like Susan and Marius.
I wonder if anything will happen to those guys, considering their faces are all over the Chilean national news.
It’s amazing that that was pretty much the fantasy I had of what could happen in the situation, with the key caveat that I didn’t expect that I would be the one front and center of the situation.
But hey, if being the star of an investigative journalism special doesn’t change anything, I don’t know what will.  And it’s been pretty cool getting messages from random people about how they feel bad for me and how they think I’m cool (despite not knowing me).
Twice in a row, I’ve gotten political opinions from people in one place about the country that I am going to next.  The first was a Montenegrin girl saying that she didn’t think Kosovo should be a country, as it should be part of Serbia, since it was her opinion that the Albanians just showed up, then wanted their own country.
The second case was a Kosovan guy saying (with chagrin) that he took Greece’s side on the Macedonian naming dispute.

I just watched the video from the Chilean news report.  Wow.  They used a ton of my video footage and a helluva lot of the stuff they shot of me in interviews.  I totally didn’t expect to see all of that.  It was also amusing to see shots of some of my friends that I met in Chile, like Susan and Marius.

I wonder if anything will happen to those guys, considering their faces are all over the Chilean national news.

It’s amazing that that was pretty much the fantasy I had of what could happen in the situation, with the key caveat that I didn’t expect that I would be the one front and center of the situation.

But hey, if being the star of an investigative journalism special doesn’t change anything, I don’t know what will.  And it’s been pretty cool getting messages from random people about how they feel bad for me and how they think I’m cool (despite not knowing me).

On the bus from Podgorica to Pristina, a woman was traveling with her baby.  She seemed amused by the fact that the baby kept smiling at me and looking over.  As I tend to do, I made faces at the baby.  Before we were about to leave one of the stops along the way, I sat in my usual back seat of the bus where I lounge out.  The woman stood in the aisle, with the baby looking back at me.  The woman kept laughing about it and pointed out to her friend/relative what was going on.  The baby would cry at points, but would look back at me happily. As we didn’t leave the stop, I figured I may as well go up and hang out.

The woman handed the baby to her friend/relative and offered me a ladyfinger.  I said thanks and ate it.  It occurred to me that maybe she was offering me it to give to her baby, so I clarified and it was, in fact for me.  I kept trying to get the baby to grab my finger, to no luck.  I went to make a grab for the baby, ready for one of them to stop me from trying to hold it.  That didn’t happen, so I ended up holding the baby, who didn’t cry, but seemed a bit confused.  Meanwhile, the friend had been talking to the baby in brief English phrases, such as ‘Hello’, ‘Goodbye’, ‘What’s your name?’ and ‘Thank you very much’.  The mother repeatedly offered me the ladyfingers and as I was ladyfingered out, she gave me the rest of them.

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